Federal Court Short Circuits Officer’s Qualified Immunity Defense
Federal Court Short Circuits Officer’s Qualified Immunity Defense

Federal Court Short Circuits Officer’s Qualified Immunity Defense

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Episode #54
A big win coming out of the Fifth Circuit Court Of Appeals in the case of Rogers v. Smith. The Court affirmed that a police officer who deprived a citizen of their first and fourth amendment rights when they arrested that citizen for criminal libel, despite the police’s prior awareness the criminal libel law in question, Louisiana Revised Statutes §14.47 had been ruled unconstitutional by both the Louisiana and United States Supreme Courts.
For these reason the police officers being sued in this case were DENIED qualified immunity and held to have deprived the plaintiff of his civil rights under color of law in accordance with 42 U.S.C. §1983

I also use this case to discuss one of the most common and problematic myths in constitutional law. The writ-of-erasure fallacy. This deals with the crucial distinction between a law that has been ruled unconstitutional by the Courts and the actual repeal of that law by the legislature. The confusion over this legal doctrine frequently has major real world consequences and we discuss what they are.

Show Notes Page for Federal Court Short Circuits Officer’s Qualified Immunity Defense – https://constitutionallaw.substack.com/p/episode-54-fifth-circuit-short-circuits

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Legalese is a podcast that discusses all things constitutional law as well as current events in politics and other areas of law.

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